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Stained Glass Windows in All Saints' Church, Winthorpe.

CHANCEL - East - 'Blessings, Honour, Glory and Power.' The term ‘stained glass' refers either to the material of coloured glass or to the art and craft of working with it. Throughout its thousand-year history the term stained glass was applied almost exclusively to the windows of churches, cathedrals and other significant buildings.

As a material the term stained glass generally refers to glass that has been coloured by adding metallic salts during its manufacture. The coloured glass is crafted into stained glass windows in which small pieces of glass are arranged to form patterns or pictures, held together (traditionally) by strips of lead and supported by a rigid frame. Painted details and yellow stain are often used to enhance the design. The term stained glass is also applied to windows in which all the colours have been painted onto the glass and then annealed in a furnace.

 
 Stained glass, as an art and a craft, requires the artistic skill to conceive an appropriate workable design, and the engineering skills necessary to assemble the decorative piece, traditionally a window, so that it will fit snugly into the window frame for which it is made and also, especially in the larger windows, is capable of supporting its own weight and surviving the elements. The designs in church windows are narratives drawn from the Bible with episodes from the life of Christ.

The stained glass windows in All Saints' Church, Winthorpe were commissioned by the Victorian architect Sidney Gambier-Parry for the Rev. Edward Handley, Rector of the church. The windows were made by Clement Heaton, James Butler and Robert T. Bayne, one of England's leading firms of Gothic Revival stained glass manufacturers. Founded in 1855 and still continuing, they established their studio a decade later in Covent Garden, London.

The Lancet windows are viewed in a clockwise direction starting at the Chancel.

 

CHANCEL.

 

East.

The most notable window in the church is above the altar. This was presented by Mrs. Edward Gordon, daughter of a late Rector of this church and is a memorial to CASSANDRA HANDLEY who died 1859, wife of Rev. Charles Richard Handley 1786-1873.  CHANCEL - South - 'The Word was made flesh.'

    The inscription, in the centre of the window, under God's throne is:

     ‘Blessings, Honour, Glory and Power.'

     The subject of the window is:

     Our Lord in Glory surrounded by all His Saints.

 

South.

There are three side windows in the south side of the Chancel.

 

 1.  The inscription on this window is:

     ‘The word was made flesh.'

     The subject of the window is:

     St. Mary the Virgin and the Infant Saviour.

    On a brass plaque under this window is the following:

     In filial memory of  CAROLINE HANDLEY, died January 19th 1860.

     (Rev. Edward Handley's mother.)CHANCEL - South - 'Rabboni.'

 

2.  The inscription on this window is:

     ‘Rabboni.'

     The subject is:

     Our Lord appearing after His resurrection to Mary Magdalene.    

The word Rabboni is a title of great distinction and means ‘My Great Master.' Jesus said to Mary Magdalene, "Mary." She turned and said to Him, "Rabboni." Which is to say Teacher. John 20:16

      On a brass plaque under this window is the following:

     In memory of Georgiana Handley of St. Georges Home, Cape Town. Died December 14th 1874.

     (Rev. Edward Handley's sister.)

 

3.  The inscription on this window is:

     ‘Jesus washed the Disciples' feet.'

     The subject of the window is:

     Jesus washing the feet of the twelve Disciples at the Last Supper. This act may be performed in churches on Maundy Thursday, the day before Good Friday.

CHANCEL -South - 'Jesus washed the Disciples' feet.'

     On a brass plaque under this window is the following:

      In memory of the Sister Laura, Commuinty of All Saints. Died at Cape Town June 16th 1882.

      (Rev. Edward Handley's sister.) 

 

NAVE.

 

South.

 

There are three two-light windows here in the south side of the Nave.

 

1.  On the bottom of the first pair of windows are the words:

     To the Glory of God and in loving memory of GEORGE GILSTRAP of Winthorpe. Born Feb. 1822. Died Dec. 1864.NAVE - South - 'I am the Resurrection and the Life.' and 'Whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him, shall never thirst.' Photograph by J. Higgins, Langford.

      The inscription on the left hand window is:

     ‘I am the Resurrection and the Life.' John X1:25. 

     The subject is:

     The Raising of Lazarus.   

     The Lord, who was a close friend of Lazarus and his sisters Mary and Martha, raised Lazarus from the dead.

   

     The inscription on the right hand window is:

     ‘Whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him, shall never thirst.' John 1V:14.

     The subject is:

     The Woman of Sumaria.

     "How is it that you, being a Jew, ask me for a drink of water? I am a woman of Sumaria, and Jews have no dealings with Sumarians." John 4:6-9.

 

2.  On the bottom of the second pair of windows are the words:

     NAVE - South - 'Mary has chosen the good part.' and 'Jesus took bread and blessed it.' Photograph by J. Higgins, Langford.To the Glory of God and in loving memory of JOSEPH WILLIAM AND ELIZABETH (GILSTRAP) BRANSTON. This window is erected by their children 1888.

     The inscription on the left hand window is:

     ‘Mary hath chosen that good part.' Luke X:42.

     The subject is:

     Martha and Mary Magdalene.

     Whenever the Lord came to visit the two sisters, Martha and Mary Magdalene, while Martha provided food to please the Lord, Mary would listen to His  preaching's.

     The inscription on the right hand window is:

     ‘Jesus took bread and blessed it.' Mark X1V:22.

     The subject is:

     The Last Supper.

     The Last Supper is a description of the last meal the Lord had with His disciples prior to His arrest and crucifixion on the cross.

 

3.  On the bottom of the third pair of windows are the words:

     To the Glory of God and in loving memory of ELIZA. WARD of Winthorpe who died Dec. 31st  1891. This window was erected by her niece Margaret Myers.

 NAVE - South - 'God was manifest in the flesh' and 'Lord now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace.' Photograph by J. Higgins, Langford.    The inscription on the left hand window is:

     ‘God was manifest in the flesh.'

     The subject is:    

     That the Father is God, the Son is God and the Holy Spirit is God.

   

     The inscription on the right hand window is:

     ‘Lord now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace.'

     The subject is:

     Forgiveness.    

     For we are all sinners we can only receive forgiveness from God if we earn peace with Him.

 

BAPTISTERY.

 

There are three windows in the Baptistery.

 

1.  The inscription on this window is:BAPTISTERY - 'I am the Good Shepherd.' Photograph by J. Higgins, Langford.

     ‘I am the Good Shepherd.'

     The subject is:

     The Good Shepherd.

     A good shepherd tends, feeds and guards his sheep. Jesus, the Good Shepherd, takes care of  and looks after His sheep. His sheep are the people of this world who have accepted Him and believe He will take care of them. 

 

2.  The inscription on this window is:

     ‘This is my beloved Son.'

     The subject is:

     Our Lord being baptized by John whilst standing in the river Jordan, with the Holy Spirit descending on Him. A voice came from Heaven: "You are my Son, whom I love; with you I am well pleased." Luke 3:21-22.

         

3.  The inscription on this window is:

     ‘Suffer little children to come unto me.'

      The subject is:

     Our Lord blessing little children.

     People brought young children to Him, that He could touch them: and His disciples rebuked those that brought them. But when Jesus saw it, He was much displeased, and said unto them. "Suffer the little children to come unto Me, and  forbid them not for of such is the Kingdom of God." Mark 10:13-14.  REAR OF THE NORTH AISLE - 'This is my beloved Son, in Whom I am well pleased.'

    

REAR OF THE NORTH AISLE.

 

There is one window on the rear of the north Aisle.

    

     The inscription on this window is:

     "This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased."

      The subject is:    

     Jesus with the disciples, Peter, James and John his brother led them up into the mountains with God calling out from the clouds. "This is my beloved Son in whom I am well pleased. Hear Him". Matthew17:1-9.

     On a brass plaque under this window is the following:

     To the Glory of God a Thank Offering from E.Ward A.D. 1888.

 

 

NORTH AISLE.

 

There are four stained glass windows, one coloured glass window in the north Aisle and one plain glass window behind the organ.

 

1.  The inscription on this window is:NORTH AISLE - 'St. Chistopher.'

     ‘Saint Christopher.'

      The subject is:    

     St. Christopher, whose emblems are a staff and the Christ Child, is typically depicted as a tall middle-aged, bearded man carrying a staff who wades across a river carrying the Christ Child on his shoulders. When he finally reached the other side, he said to the child: "You have put me in the greatest danger. I do not think the whole world could have been as heavy on my shoulders as you were." The child replied: "You had on your shoulders not only the whole world but him who made it. I am Christ your king, whom you are serving by this work." It is this popular story from which St. Christopher became the Patron saint of travellers.

     Notice the staff cut from a tree branch and the sketch of the Church of St. Mary Magdalene, Newark in the top left hand corner of the window.    

     (In the bottom left hand corner of the window is the artist's name, BRONWEN GORDON 1983.)  

     (See Footnote.)

 

2.  The inscription on this window is:

     ‘S. Hugh B.'

     (S. and B. are the abbreviations for Saint and Bishop.)

     The subject is:    

     St. Hugh, 1140-1200, was made Bishop of Lincoln in 1186 by King Henry 11 and immediately started to rebuild the Cathedral after it had been destroyed by a giant earthquake the previous year. In the window St. Hugh is shown wearing a mitre and holding a crosier and a model of Lincoln Cathedral with a white swan at his feet. The swan, which became his emblem, is a reference to the beautiful story of the great swan of Stowe which contracted a deep and lasting friendship for the saint even guarding him while he slept. Better known as St. Hugh of Lincoln, he is the Patron saint of sick children, sick people and swans. NORTH AISLE - 'St. Hugh.'

     The words on the bottom of this window are:

     A.M.D.G. et Sac. Mem. EDWARD ALLWOOD ob. July 21st 1928. The gift of his children.

     A.M.D.G. et sac. Mem. is the abbreviation for the Latin words:

     Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam et Sacra Memoriae.

     ‘To the Greater Glory of God and in Sacred Memory.'

     ob is the abbreviation for the Latin word:

    obdormio meaning

     'To fall asleep.'

 

3.  There is no inscription on this window but it is: 

     ‘St. Francis of Assisi.'

      The subject is:   

     St. Francis, 1182-1226, who is the Patron saint of animals, birds and the environment, was born in the town of Assisi, Italy and is the founder of the religious Franciscan Order. The window shows St. Francis dressed as a monk wearing  sandals, a rope around his waist and surrounded by animals and birds. The well known hymn, ‘Make me a Channel of your Peace' is a translation from The Prayer of St. Francis, which is a prayer for peace.

     On a brass plaque under this window is the following:

     In memory of the Sister FRANCES CHRISTINA of the Community of All Saints and previously of St. George's Home, Cape Town. Died March 3rd 1895.

     (In the bottom left hand corner of the window is the artist's name, BRONWEN GORDON 1989.)   NORTH AISLE - 'St. Francis of Assisi.'

     (See Footnote.)

 

4.  There is no inscription on this window but it is:

     ‘Jesus walking on the water.'

      The subject is:

     Jesus approaching his disciples, who were in trouble on the Sea of Galilee by a strong wind and heavy waves. He walked on the water to rescue them. Peter called, "Lord if it is really You. Tell me to come to you by walking on water." "All right, come," Jesus said. So, Peter walked on the water towards Jesus and became afraid by the high waves. "Save me, Lord!" he shouted. Jesus reached out his hand and grabbed him. "You do not have much faith," Jesus said. "Why do you doubt me?" And when they climbed back into the boat, the wind stopped. After they had crossed the lake they landed. 

     On the bottom of the window is:

     In affectionate remembrance of HELEN JANE KELK by A.S.P-D., E.S.P-D. and G.S.P-D. She "being dead yet speaketh." Heb. 11.4

     (See Footnote.)

 

5.  Coloured glass window.

 

6.  Plain glass window, which is behind the organ.

 

Pat Finn. August 2008.

 

Footnote.

 

The bottom part of the ‘Mary hath chosen that good part' window in the south side of the Nave was repaired in 2002 after becoming damaged due to a forced entry.  

 

The ‘St Christopher' window in the north Aisle was fitted in 1983 replacing the original window after it became damaged due to a forced entry. The artist, Bronwen Gordon, who trained at Edinburgh Art College, was a specialist in stained glass and has commissioned many works throughout the country, including the Church of The Holy Trinity at Ratcliffe-on-Soar, Nottinghamshire.

 

The ‘St. Francis of Assisi' window, also in the north Aisle, was fitted in 1989 to replace the damaged window of Abraham, the first Patriarch of the Jewish people. Once again the artist was Bronwen Gordon.  

 

It is noticeable that the stained glass in the St. Christopher and the St. Francis of Assisi windows are much paler than the other windows. These are admitting more daylight into the darken area of the north Aisle.

 

On the ‘Jesus walking on water' window in the north Aisle the letters A.S.P-D., E.S.P-D. and G.S.P-D could mean:

Anabella Slingsby Pierce-Duncombe.

Elizabeth Slingsby Pierce-Duncombe.

Georgiana Slingsby Pierce-Duncombe.

They were the daughters of George Thomas Pierce Slingsby-Duncombe, owner of Winthorpe Hall from1867-1906.

Helen J. Kelk was a visitor at the Hall during the 1881 census period.

 

Further readings can be found in:  

         All Saints' Church in Volume1.

         The Bells of All Saints' Church in Volume 3.

         Winthorpe Church - Property 1764 in Volume 4.

         Consecration of All Saints' Church, Winthorpe in Volume 4.

         Winthorpe Church Windows in Volume 4.      

         The Churches at Winthorpe in Volume 4.

         Memorials in All Saints' Church, Winthorpe in Volume 4.

         All Saints' Church Bells, Winthorpe in Volume 4.

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